Archive for September 16th, 2010

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In the sleepy hamlet of Granville, NY, in the foothills of the Adirondack mountains, adjoining the border of Vermont, history and a commitment are being honored.

The Village has issued an invitation to the rededication of the Veterans Clock which has been restored after it ceased to function 25 years ago.

Saturday, September 18th, 5pm, Corner of Main and North Streets.

The original clock on that site was attached to the Granville National Bank Building which was erected in 1875.  On November 30, 1942, the old bank building was destroyed in a fire and the clock destroyed.

On January 7, 1943, a letter to the Editor, written by Malcolm F. Kelley, was published which proposed replacing the clock with a new one which would commemorate the men serving in World War II.

In March the American Legion secured permission from the Washington County National Bank to mount a new electric clock on the corner of their building.

The clock is to bear an appropriate inscription as a memorial to the boys who are now fighting America’s battles in defense of democracy

Fundraising for the clock began in May, 1943, starting with a Tag Sale.

The contest for the inscription was also proceeding rapidly.

The townspeople were generous with donations.

The Fire Department planned a carnival for July 3rd, which was hugely successful and pushed the project over the funding goal line.

In the weeks following, the inscription was chosen, the clock was ordered, and preparations for the dedication were made.

On Sunday, September 26, 1943, the veterans clock, one of the first memorials to the troops fighting in World War II was dedicated.

For 40+ years the bronze clock with its stained glass clock face and inscriptions steadily chimed every quarter hour, rain, snow or shine.  Two generations grew up in Granville to the reassuring certainty of the clock.

Then, twenty five years ago, it fell silent.  The bronze hands, long the standards for punctuality, stood motionless.  The chimes, those melodious beacons, which proclaimed the march of time throughout the center of town, rang no more.

And so it sat, forlorn, a mockery of its own inscription, “Lest We Forget”. Continue Reading »